Hip Replacement

high failure rate and complications due to release of metal ions
Hip Replacement

ABOUT THE DEVICE

Hip replacements are the surgical repair of an aged or injured natural hip joint by adding an artificial joint or implant. This surgery dates back over three centuries. Reasons for these implants are the same now as they were then: a fracture or similar injury to the hip, arthritis or a wearing down of the joint over time. Patients who have undergone hip replacement surgery may experience problems shortly following the surgery or years down the road.

Although there are varied designs and models of artificial hips built by several manufacturers, there are three basic components: A stem that is inserted into the femur (thighbone), a ball that attaches to the top of the femur, and a cup that attaches to the pelvis. Modern implants are made from a combination of materials, including plastics, ceramics and metals. Many of the most recent devices were metal-on-metal designs, created with the hope that hip replacements would last longer to give younger, active patients more pain-free mobility for more years.

PURPOSE OF THE DEVICE

Depending on the age of the patient and the nature of the injury or condition, there are various surgical procedures to consider with the goal of reducing pain and increasing mobility. The three hip replacement procedures are total hip replacement, partial hip replacement and hip resurfacing.

WARNINGS

Metal-on-metal hip systems are classified as Class III (higher risk) devices but are regulated under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) premarket notification program. This means they are not required to undergo premarket testing or clinical trials before they are used in patients. Under the 510(k) programs, manufacturers simply must state that their products are like products already on the market.

In May 2011, the FDA ordered 21 manufacturers of metal-on-metal products to conduct post-market studies. A year later, the FDA panel found there is little reason to continue to use metal-on-metal implants.

SIDE EFFECTS

Patients who have undergone hip replacement surgery may experience problems shortly following the surgery or years later. In many cases, complications that follow stem from the materials used in the implants. For example, metal-on-metal implants can lead to metallosis, which is a serious condition that occurs when metallic debris builds in the soft tissue. Osteolysis, another complication that can occur following hip replacement surgery, is the loss of bone around the implant as the body works to “clean up” foreign particles produced by the device during normal movement. This can lead to loosening and failure of the implant

HOW BERNSTEIN, DECAILLY & MARSHALL, PLLC CAN HELP

There are many complications that can arise from surgery. Patients have made legal claims against some of the most popular hip implant manufacturers, including DePuy, Stryker and Zimmer. Since the complications can vary from patient to patient, plaintiffs are mostly concerned with their ongoing medical care needs as well as any future surgeries that may be required. Pain and suffering as well as emotional distress can come from complications associated with hip replacement devices. That is why we want to help those affected seek the help they need and are entitled to. No one should have to suffer alone. We focus on ending a chapter of pain and beginning one of hope and recovery.

Hip Replacement

high failure rate and complications due to release of metal ions
Hip Replacement

ABOUT THE DEVICE

Hip replacements are the surgical repair of an aged or injured natural hip joint by adding an artificial joint or implant. This surgery dates back over three centuries. Reasons for these implants are the same now as they were then: a fracture or similar injury to the hip, arthritis or a wearing down of the joint over time. Patients who have undergone hip replacement surgery may experience problems shortly following the surgery or years down the road.

Although there are varied designs and models of artificial hips built by several manufacturers, there are three basic components: A stem that is inserted into the femur (thighbone), a ball that attaches to the top of the femur, and a cup that attaches to the pelvis. Modern implants are made from a combination of materials, including plastics, ceramics and metals. Many of the most recent devices were metal-on-metal designs, created with the hope that hip replacements would last longer to give younger, active patients more pain-free mobility for more years.

PURPOSE OF THE DEVICE

Depending on the age of the patient and the nature of the injury or condition, there are various surgical procedures to consider with the goal of reducing pain and increasing mobility. The three hip replacement procedures are total hip replacement, partial hip replacement and hip resurfacing.

WARNINGS

Metal-on-metal hip systems are classified as Class III (higher risk) devices but are regulated under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) premarket notification program. This means they are not required to undergo premarket testing or clinical trials before they are used in patients. Under the 510(k) programs, manufacturers simply must state that their products are like products already on the market.

In May 2011, the FDA ordered 21 manufacturers of metal-on-metal products to conduct post-market studies. A year later, the FDA panel found there is little reason to continue to use metal-on-metal implants.

SIDE EFFECTS

Patients who have undergone hip replacement surgery may experience problems shortly following the surgery or years later. In many cases, complications that follow stem from the materials used in the implants. For example, metal-on-metal implants can lead to metallosis, which is a serious condition that occurs when metallic debris builds in the soft tissue. Osteolysis, another complication that can occur following hip replacement surgery, is the loss of bone around the implant as the body works to “clean up” foreign particles produced by the device during normal movement. This can lead to loosening and failure of the implant

HOW BERNSTEIN, DECAILLY & MARSHALL, PLLC CAN HELP

There are many complications that can arise from surgery. Patients have made legal claims against some of the most popular hip implant manufacturers, including DePuy, Stryker and Zimmer. Since the complications can vary from patient to patient, plaintiffs are mostly concerned with their ongoing medical care needs as well as any future surgeries that may be required. Pain and suffering as well as emotional distress can come from complications associated with hip replacement devices. That is why we want to help those affected seek the help they need and are entitled to. No one should have to suffer alone. We focus on ending a chapter of pain and beginning one of hope and recovery.

There is no fee unless you are awarded compensation

(844) 875-4747